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IWA – Faecal Sludge Management, systems approach for implementation and operation

11 hours 21 min ago
This link also has a info on an online course, how to order the hardcopy, etc;

The first book dedicated to Faecal Sludge Management (FSM) has been published recently by IWA Publishing. The book ‘Faecal Sludge Management, systems approach for implementation and operation‘ as well as the individual chapters can be downloaded from this page. Damir Brdjanovic, Professor of Sanitary Engineering and Mariska Ronteltap, Senior Lecturer of Sanitary Engineering at UNESCO-IHE have edited the book, together with Dr. Linda Strande, director of the Excreta and Wastewater Management group at EAWAG (the Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology). The book is funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation. 
Summary

The appropriate and adequate management of faecal sludge deriving from onsite technologies is imperative for the protection of human and environmental health. This is the first book dedicated to faecal sludge management. It compiles the current state of knowledge of this rapidly evolving field, and presents an integrated approach that includes technology, management and planning. It addresses the planning and organization of the entire faecal sludge management service chain, from the collection and transport of sludge and treatment options, to the final enduse or disposal of treated sludge. In addition to providing fundamentals and an overview of technologies, the book goes into details of operational, institutional and financial aspects, and provides guidance on how to plan a city-level faecal sludge management project with the involvement of all the stakeholders.

Chapter downloads Project planning scheme – Technology Selection Flow Chart and Project Planning Scheme

Online course The objective of the online course is to gain an understanding of all of the required aspects for the design and operation of a comprehensive faecal sludge management system. The next course will start on 5 January 2015. Go to the course page.
Short course
The three-week short course addresses a holistic approach on FSM. There will be a focus on technology; however, technology cannot be seen separately from planning and management aspects; therefore, non-technical aspects will also be addressed in this module. The next course will start on 30 June 2014. Go to the course page.

Pro-poor sanitation innovations UNESCO-IHE and partners received an 8 million dollar grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The grant will be used to finance a 5-year capacity building and research project to stimulate local innovation on sanitation for the urban poor in sub-Saharan Africa and South-East Asia. Read more here about the project.
Filed under: Wastewater Management Tagged: faecal sludge management

WASHplus Weekly: Focus on WASH & Human Rights

19 September 2014 10:42 (America/New_York)

Issue 162 | Sept 19, 2014 | Focus on WASH & Human Rights

This issue highlights the just-published handbook on WASH and human rights by Catarina de Albuquerque, the UN special rapporteur on the human right to safe drinking water and sanitation. Also included are studies from the UNC Water Institute; Human Rights Watch; fact sheets and position statements from the UN and UNICEF; country reports from the DRC, Haiti, and South Africa; and links to relevant websites.

Realising the Human Rights to Water and Sanitation: A Handbook, 2014. C de Albuquerque. (Link)
This handbook is the product of six years of work by the first UN special rapporteur on the human rights to safe drinking water and sanitation. It explains the meaning and legal obligations that arise from these rights, translating the often complex technical and legal language into accessible information. The target audiences for this handbook are governments at all levels, donors, and national regulatory bodies. It provides information that will also be useful to other local, regional, and international stakeholders, including civil society, service providers, and human rights organizations.

Fact Sheet on the Right to Water, n.d. United Nations. | Arabic | English | French |Spanish
The roots of the current water and sanitation crisis can be traced to poverty, inequality, and unequal power relationships, and it is exacerbated by social and environmental challenges: accelerating urbanization, climate change, and increasing pollution and depletion of water resources. To address this crisis, the international community has increasingly recognized that access to safe drinking water and sanitation must be considered within a human rights framework.

Translating the Human Right to Water and Sanitation into Public Policy Reform.Science and Engineering Ethics, Jan 2014. B Meier. (Link)
The development of a human right to water and sanitation under international law has created an imperative to implement human rights in water and sanitation policy. Through 43 interviews with informants in international institutions, national governments, and NGOs, this research examines interpretations of this new human right on global governance, national policy, and local practice.

Examining the Practice of Developing Human Rights Indicators to Facilitate Accountability for the Human Right to Water and Sanitation. Journal of Human Rights Practice, Mar 2014. B Meier. (Link)
This policy note focuses on efforts to develop indicators for state reporting to human rights treaty bodies. It proposes an indicator development model as a basis for developing indicators that reflect the attributes of the right to water and sanitation, enlist key stakeholders in the policy making process, and have political relevance for state reporting.

Equity in Water and Sanitation: Developing an Index to Measure Progressive Realization of the Human Right. International Journal of Hygiene and Environmental Health, Jan 2013. J Luh. (Link)
The authors developed an index to measure progressive realization of the human right to water and sanitation. While in this study they demonstrate its application to the nondiscrimination and equality component for water, the conceptual approach of the index can be used for all the different components of the human right.

Implementing an Evolving Human Right through Water and Sanitation PolicyWater Policy, Nov 2013. B Meier. (Link)
Examining the opportunities created by this UN resolution, this article analyzes the implementation of the human right to water and sanitation through global water governance, national water policy, and water and sanitation outcomes. While obstacles remain at each step in the implementation of this right, the authors conclude that the UN resolution could have lasting effects on public health through rights-based water and sanitation policy.

Cleaning Human Waste: “Manual Scavenging,” Caste, and Discrimination in India, 2014. Human Rights Watch. (Link)
This report documents the coercive nature of manual scavenging. Across India, castes that work as “manual scavengers” collect human excrement on a daily basis, and carry it away in cane baskets for disposal. Women from this caste usually clean dry toilets in homes, while men do the more physically demanding cleaning of sewers and septic tanks.

Menstrual Hygiene Day Links Periods and Human Rights, 2014. A Klasing, Human Rights Watch. (Link)
Handling periods (or “menstrual hygiene management” as experts call it) isn’t the first thing one might associate with human rights. Yet the link between realization of rights for women and girls and menstrual hygiene management could not be clearer.

The Rights to Safe Water and Sanitation. 2014. UNICEF. (Link)
UNICEF supports realization of the right to water and sanitation through an equity-focused approach.

The Availability, Accessibility, Acceptability and Quality (AAAQ) Framework and the Right to Water, 2014. M Jensen, Danish Institute for Human Rights. (Link)
This issue paper explores a possible generic methodology for the operationalization of rights, exemplified through the right to water. The key aims of this methodology are: to identify the core normative dimensions of the right in terms of the criteria of availability, accessibility, acceptability, and quality (AAAQ) and to develop a framework on the basis of the AAAQ criteria that consists of specific standards, generic indicators, and generic benchmarks.

Global Water Scarcity: Health, Human Rights and Environmental Challenges, 2014. R Pink. (Video)
Dr. Ross Michael Pink is a co-founder of Global Water Rights and has designed and taught courses on water rights and development. His presentation at the University of Toronto focuses on global water scarcity with case studies from India, Indonesia, Mali, and Tibet.

The Right to Sanitation: Time to Delink from the Right to Water. Human Rights Quarterly, Aug 2014. K Ellis. (Abstract)
Within the human rights arena, water and sanitation are very often presented as linked together. This article examines the historical roots of this linkage as well as its manifestation at both the international and domestic level in countries that have formally recognized a right to water and sanitation. The analysis leads to a conclusion that a continuation of the linkage is not historically warranted, nor does it offer clear advantages for realization of a right to water or a right to sanitation.

The Free Flow Principles: Freedom of Expression and Rights to Water and Sanitation, 2014. ARTICLE 19. (Link)
The right to freedom of expression is a fundamental human right, necessary for individual self-fulfillment, self-realization, and autonomy and for the functioning of a democratic form of government. Freedom of expression is key to the success of any efforts that aim at the realization of the rights to water and sanitation.

Can Water Be a Human Right? Appeal, 19(131) 2014. K Snell. (Link)
The human right to water was recognized in the 2002 CESCR General Comment 15 as well as in a 2010 UN General Assembly Declaration. While a human right to water may appear attractive as a means of preventing waterborne disease and ensuring adequate supply of water for basic domestic needs, many questions are raised when one considers how a declaration of the right translates into an actual legal entitlement.

COUNTRY REPORTS

DRC – In Search of Clean Water: Human Rights and the Mining Industry in Katanga, DRC, 2014. A Montejano. (Link)
This report begins by setting out the context in the Katanga Province and providing an overview of the human right to water. It then assesses, firstly, whether mining companies comply with the national mining regulations, stressing also the importance of the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights and taking the concept of human rights due diligence as a benchmark; secondly, the performance of the DRC vis-a-vis its international human rights obligations, emphasizing the participation of state-owned companies in the mining sector; and lastly, the role of the home states of the polluting companies and their extraterritorial obligations regarding the protection of the human right to water in the DRC.

Haiti – Cholera as a Grave Violation of the Right to Water in Haiti, 2014. S Dávila-Ruhaak. (Link)
This report on cholera in Haiti provides a case study of strategies used and difficulties faced by victims seeking accountability and remedies for right-to-water violations perpetrated by nonstate actors.

South Africa – Report on the Right to Access Sufficient Water and Decent Sanitation in South Africa, 2014. South African Human Rights Commission. (Link)
This report provides an overview of the state of access to water and sanitation in South Africa. It provides the framework for the commission’s work on water and sanitation by looking at the status quo. It gives an overview of the impact that a lack of access to water and sanitation can have one one’s life and dignity and one’s ability to access other human rights. The section ends with an analysis of the state of national and provincial access to water and sanitation in the country.

USA – United Nations Says Turning Off Poor Detroiters’ Water Violates Human Rights. Huffington Post, June 2014. K Abbey-Lambertz. (Link)
Detroit has been shutting off water to customers who reportedly can’t afford to pay their bills, and United Nations experts said Wednesday it’s a violation of human rights. The UN responded after a coalition of activist groups submitted a report to its Human Rights Office of the High Commissioner detailing water shutoffs and extreme consequences for families in the city who can’t afford to pay their bills and have had to go without water.

WEBSITES

UN Special Rapporteur on the Human Right to Water and Sanitation(Link)
The UN Human Rights Council in March 2008 initially established the mandate of the special rapporteur on the human right to safe drinking water and sanitation as the independent expert on the issue of human rights obligations related to access to safe drinking water and sanitation. Catarina de Albuquerque took up the mandate in November 2008. As special rapporteur, Ms. de Albuquerque carries out thematic research, undertakes country missions, and works with development practitioners on the implementation of the rights to water and sanitation.

Rights to Water and Sanitation(Link)
Use this site to find out more about why water and sanitation as human rights are key to achieving universal access to safe water and sanitation. Also, find out about what progress has been made in getting the rights recognized and what impact the implementation of the right has made so far.

United Nations – The Human Right to Water and Sanitation. (Link)
Links to UN resolutions and reports on WASH and human rights.


Filed under: Dignity and Social Development Tagged: human rights

Factors Associated With Pupil Toilet Use in Kenyan Primary Schools

19 September 2014 10:08 (America/New_York)

Factors Associated With Pupil Toilet Use in Kenyan Primary Schools. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health, 2014, 11(9), 9694-9711; doi:10.3390/ijerph110909694

Joshua V. Garn, Bethany A. Caruso, et al.

The purpose of this study was to quantify how school sanitation conditions are associated with pupils’ use of sanitation facilities. We conducted a longitudinal assessment in 60 primary schools in Nyanza Province, Kenya, using structured observations to measure facility conditions and pupils’ use at specific facilities. We used multivariable mixed regression models to characterize how pupil to toilet ratio was associated with toilet use at the school-level and also how facility conditions were associated with pupils’ use at specific facilities.

We found a piecewise linear relationship between decreasing pupil to toilet ratio and increasing pupil toilet use (p < 0.01). Our data also revealed significant associations between toilet use and newer facility age (p < 0.01), facility type (p < 0.01), and the number of toilets in a facility (p < 0.01). We found some evidence suggesting facility dirtiness may deter girls from use (p = 0.06), but not boys (p = 0.98).

Our study is the first to rigorously quantify many of these relationships, and provides insight into the complexity of factors affecting pupil toilet use patterns, potentially leading to a better allocation of resources for school sanitation, and to improved health and educational outcomes for children.


Filed under: Africa, Sanitary Facilities Tagged: Kenya, toilet use, WASH in schools

USAID DELIVER – Guide to Health Care Waste Management for the Community Health Worker

19 September 2014 10:01 (America/New_York)

USAID Deliver Project – Guide to Health Care Waste Management for the Community Health Worker, 2014. (In English and French)

The USAID | DELIVER PROJECT has published a French language version of the Guide to Health Care Waste Management for the Community Health Worker. This illustrated guide is now available in French and English. 

This publication provides practical guidance for community health workers on how to safely handle and dispose of hazardous waste. It describes the basic principles of waste management and offers solutions for managing the waste generated from everyday activities carried out in the community.


Filed under: Sanitary Facilities Tagged: health care wastes

Designing the next generation of sanitation businesses

17 September 2014 13:05 (America/New_York)

Designing the next generation of sanitation businesses: a report by HYSTRA for the Toilet Board Coalition, 2014.

Fortunately, a number of market-based models have emerged in both rural and urban areas to address the sanitation crisis. They all serve the Base of the Pyramid in a sustainable manner by offering improved solutions, at a price that the poor are willing and able to pay. In this Report, we analyze two models that combine an aspirational value proposition for low-income families and a strong potential for financial sustainability: projects that facilitate the creation of a local, sanitation market in rural areas and enterprises servicing home mobile toilets in urban areas.

Based on an in-depth analysis of 12 projects representative of these two models, the Report suggests strategies to overcome challenges to sustainability and scale. Finally, the Report explores how these models would benefit from corporate and industrial expertise and resources, opening up opportunities for large corporations to contribute to solving the sanitation crisis.


Filed under: Publications Tagged: entrepreneurs, Hystra, Sanitation as a business

Sandec Eawag – Behind the Data: The People Who Make Research Happen

16 September 2014 15:10 (America/New_York)

Published on Sep 12, 2014 -“Behind The Data: The People Who Make Research Happen” is a short documentary, highlighting the work that was done in rural communities by the people who were instrumental in collecting and recording data for a sanitation-based research project. We aim to show the fundamental value of each person’s role in achieving the ultimate research objectives.


Filed under: Research Tagged: data collection, Sandec

IRC WASH – The ideal WASH sustainability tool

16 September 2014 13:25 (America/New_York)

If you could start from scratch and design a new WASH sustainability tool, what would it look like?

Participants from the 2014 WASH Sustainability Forum share their ideas on the principles of their ideal WASH sustainability tool.

The 2014 WASH Sustainability Forum brought together over 150 participants from nearly 30 countries to discuss concrete approaches to Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) Sustainability. The Forum took place in Amsterdam, on 30 June and 1 July. 2014. More info: http://www.ircwash.org/news/5th-wash-…and #WASH2014

With inputs from:
Charles Yeboah (Safe Water Network), Barbara Evans (University of Leeds), Chaitaili Chattopadhyah (WSSCC), Prakhar Goel (Control Union), Joanne McGriff (Center for Global Safe Water, Emory University), Jose Gesti Canuto (UNICEF), Guy Norman (WSUP), Julia Rosenbaum (USAID/WASHplus), Naabiah Ofosuh-Amaah (Global Environment & Technology Foundation).

Interview: Cor Dietvorst.
Camera: Thomas Hurkxkens


Filed under: Uncategorized

Pacific Love (Unofficial Peace Corps Anthem) – Poop in a Hole

16 September 2014 13:11 (America/New_York)

Filed under: Uncategorized Tagged: music video

Focus on WASH & Nutrition: WASHplus Weekly, Sept 5, 2014

5 September 2014 10:41 (America/New_York)

Issue 160 | Sept 5, 2014 | Focus on WASH & Nutrition

This issue contains some of the most recent studies on stunting, open defecation, nutritional interventions, and other WASH and nutrition issues. Recent reports from the World Bank Water and Sanitation Program discuss the impacts of improved sanitation on child growth in Vietnam and Lao PDR. Training materials include the new Global Handwashing Day guide from the Global Public-Private Partnership on Handwashing and a WASHplus infographic on tippy taps.

BLOG POSTS 

Left, Right, and Toilets. Ideas for India, Aug 2014. D Spears. (Link)
Eliminating open defecation in India is a policy priority. This column contends that successful strategies for reducing open defecation may not fit policy stereotypes of the left or the right. While rural sanitation policy in states where this practice is most concentrated has been focused on latrine construction, promotion of latrine use is what will make a difference.

What Do Toilets Have To Do with Nutrition? More Than You Might Think. IFPRI Blog, July 2014. L Haddad. (Link)
A new working paper from the Institute of Development Studies has looked at data from 116 low- and middle-income countries from 1970 to 2012. It found that access to safe water (20 percent) and improved sanitation (15 percent) explained 35 percent of the variation in stunting rates across countries and time periods. This reflects two things: the fact that water and sanitation are strongly linked to stunting reduction, and that both water and sanitation coverage have increased strongly in the past four decades.

JOURNAL ARTICLES BY PUBLICATION DATE

The Effect of India’s Total Sanitation Campaign on Defecation Behaviors and Child Health in Rural Madhya Pradesh: A Cluster Randomized Controlled TrialPLoS Medicine, Aug 2014. R Sumeet. (Link)
The objective of this study is to measure the effect of the Total Sanitation Campaign implemented with capacity building support from The World Bank’s Water and Sanitation Program in Madhya Pradesh on availability of individual household latrines (IHLs), defecation behaviors, and child health (diarrhea, highly credible gastrointestinal illness [HCGI], parasitic infections, anemia, and growth). The intervention led to modest increases in availability of IHLs and even more modest reductions in open defecation. These improvements were insufficient to improve child health outcomes. The results underscore the difficulty of achieving adequately large improvements in sanitation levels to deliver expected health benefits within large-scale rural sanitation programs.

Noncommunicable Diseases in HIV Infection in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: Gastrointestinal, Hepatic, and Nutritional Aspects. Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, Sep 2014. P Kelly. (Full-text)
The purpose of this review is to outline the interaction between HIV and noncommunicable diseases affecting the gastrointestinal tract, liver, and nutritional disorders in low- and middle-income countries, and to identify research priorities. HIV interacts strongly with environmental enteropathy, exacerbating malabsorption of nutrients and drugs. HIV and nutritional care need to be better integrated, but many questions on how best to do this remain unanswered.

An Evolving Perspective about the Origins of Childhood Undernutrition and Nutritional Interventions that Includes the Gut Microbiome. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, Aug 2014. T Ahmed. (Link)
This paper summarizes work on mechanisms underlying the varied manifestations of childhood undernutrition and discusses current gaps in knowledge and challenges to our understanding of undernutrition and infection/immunity throughout the human life cycle, focusing on early childhood growth. It proposes a series of basic and clinical studies to address this global health challenge.

Early Childhood Diarrhoeal Diseases and Cognition: Are We Missing the Rest of the Iceberg? Paediatrics and International Child Health, Aug 2014. J MacIntyre. (Abstract)
This paper reviews the burden of early childhood diarrheal diseases globally and the emerging evidence of their relationship with global disparities in neurocognitive development. The strength of evidence indicating that the severe childhood diarrheal burden may be implicated in cognitive impairment of children from low- and middle-income countries is discussed. Findings suggest that greater investment in multi-site, longitudinal enteric infection studies that assess long-term repercussions are warranted.

Climate Change, Crop Production and Child Under Nutrition in Ethiopia: A Longitudinal Panel Study. BMC Public Health, Aug 2014. S Hagos. (Link)
The amount and distribution of rainfall and temperature influence household food availability, thus increasing the risk of child undernutrition. However, few studies examined the local spatial variability and the impact of temperature and rainfall on child undernutrition at a smaller scale. We conducted this study to evaluate the effect of weather variables on child undernutrition and the variations in effects across the three agro-ecologies of Ethiopia.

Addressing Chronic Malnutrition through Multi-Sectoral, Sustainable Approaches: A Review of the Causes and Consequences. Frontiers in Nutrition, Aug 2014. K Reinhardt.(Link)
The objective of this paper is to review current knowledge on the causes and consequences of chronic malnutrition and their relationship with multiple sectors. Understanding the causes includes approaching chronic malnutrition from the basic, underlying, and immediate levels. The causes reach from macro-level environmental influences to specific micronutrient intake.

Why Worry About the Politics of Childhood Undernutrition? World Development, Vol. 64 2014. N Nisbett. (Link)
Undernutrition affects over 2 billion people, but most of the global policy focus has been on technical solutions rather than on understanding nutrition politics. This paper reviews existing literature on nutrition politics and policy. It identifies a number of recurring themes surrounding knowledge, politics, and capacities.

Undernutrition’s Blind Spot: A Review of Fecally Transmitted Infections in India.Journal of Water, Sanitation and Hygiene for Development, July 2014. R Chambers.(Abstract)
With relevance to India and more widely, this review article examines links between fecally transmitted infections (FTIs) and undernutrition, presents a new framework for understanding the relative nutritional significance of FTIs, and draws practical implications for professionals and for future research.

REPORTS/TRAINING MATERIALS

Global Handwashing Day Planner’s Guide: 3rd Edition, 2014. PPPHW. (Link)
In addition to background information, the top five facts about hand washing you should know, and insights from the latest in hand washing research, this newly revised Planner’s Guide features: detailed celebration ideas designed to help religious organizations, schools, health care centers, and more plan effective messaging and events, and an event checklist that helps planners organize and make sure their event planning is on track.

How to Make Other Types of Tippy Taps, 2014. WASHplus. (Link)
This card has instructions on how to make tippy taps from mineral water bottles, tin cans, gourds, and jerry cans.

Investing in the Next Generation: Children Grow Taller, and Smarter, in Rural, Mountainous Villages of Vietnam Where Community Members Use Improved Sanitation, 2014. Water and Sanitation Program. (Link)
The use of unimproved latrines in rural villages in mountainous regions of Vietnam leads to 5-year-old children being 3.7 cm shorter than healthy children living in villages where everybody practices improved sanitation. This difference in height is irreversible and matters a great deal for a child’s cognitive development and future productive potential. A child remains at risk of stunting if community members use unimproved sanitation facilities, even when the child’s family uses improved latrines. Community-wide sanitation interventions should be considered for integration into nutrition and poverty programs to support stunting prevention.

Investing in the Next Generation: Children Grow Taller, and Smarter, in Rural Villages of Lao PDR Where All Community Members Use Improved Sanitation, 2014. Water and Sanitation Program. (Link)
This brief summarizes research examining whether open defecation and unimproved sanitation in a rural community are related to stunted children of different age groups. Among the key findings: what happens today in terms of sanitation behaviors will affect the country’s future. Improving sanitation in rural communities of Lao PDR is thus a development priority that requires resources for a National Rural Sanitation Program.

Maharashtra’s Child Stunting Declines: What is Driving Them? Findings of a Multidisciplinary Analysis, 2014. L Haddad, Institute of Development Studies. (Link)
Between 2006 and 2012, Maharashtra’s stunting rate among children under 2 years of age was reported to decline by 15 percentage points—one of the fastest declines in stunting seen anywhere at any time. This was seemingly more remarkable because it occurred within a context where Indian stunting levels nationally are regularly characterized as stuck or static.

What Are the Factors Enabling and Constraining Effective Leaders in Nutrition? A Four Country Study, 2014. N Nisbett, Institute of Development Studies. (Link)
This study of individuals identified as influential within the nutrition sector in Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Kenya, and India examines why particular individuals champion nutrition policy, and how they operate in the wider policy and political environments of their countries.

SQUAT Survey: Sanitation Quality, Use, Access and Trends, 2014. RICE Institute.(Link)
SQUAT is a quantitative survey that was conducted in rural areas of Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh, Haryana, and Bihar. In each state, researchers visited two or three districts that had changes in household open defecation between the 2001 and 2011 censuses that were similar to the state as a whole. Within districts, villages were randomly selected, and within villages, they used an in-field randomization procedure to select households. The researchers interviewed 3,235 adults about their defecation practices and views on latrines and latrine use, and collected individual-level latrine use data for 22,787 household members.

Connecting Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene with Fresh Water Conservation and Climate Resilience: The Need to Facilitate Integration in Development Assistance, 2014. E Shope, National Resources Defense Council. (Link)
Currently, the development sector all too often addresses WASH, climate resilience, and fresh water conservation as separate issues. Fortunately, though, awareness about the importance of integrated efforts to solve these challenges in development projects is increasing. USAID has publicly spoken about and financially supported some efforts to promote integrated solutions for addressing WASH, conservation, and climate.

Care Groups—An Effective Community-Based Delivery Strategy for Improving Reproductive, Maternal, Neonatal and Child Health in High-Mortality, Resource-Constrained Settings, 2014. H Perry. (Link)
Care Groups are an innovation in reproductive, maternal, neonatal, and child health programming that is gaining increasing recognition because of their effectiveness in promoting behavior change and expanding population coverage of key interventions. This paper provides policy makers and donors with an introduction to the Care Group approach and an overview of the evidence of their effectiveness.


Filed under: Sanitation and Health Tagged: WASH nutrition integration

Seven journalists win prestigious media awards for excellence in reporting on critical water, sanitation and hygiene issues

5 September 2014 9:11 (America/New_York)

Geneva/Stockholm, 5 September 2014 – Seven journalists were named today as winners of the “2014 WASH Media Awards” competition for their excellence in reporting on water, sanitation and hygiene-related (WASH) issues.

 The journalists, their winning entries, and the award categories are:

 

  • Marcelo Leite (Brazil):The Battle of Belo Monte” (Category: Water and Energy)
  • Natasha Khan (Canada) and Ketaki Gokhale (USA) No Menstrual Hygiene For Indian Women Holds Economy Back(Category: Equity and Inclusion in Water, Sanitation and Hygiene)
  • Seun Aikoye (Nigeria):Lagosians shun public toilets as open defecation continues(Category: Ending Open Defecation)
  • Mbali Chiya (South Africa):Human Rights to Water and Sanitation (Category: The Human Right to Water and Sanitation)
  • Umaru Sanda Amadu (Ghana): “Water Wahala(Category: WASH in the Future: The Post-2015 Development Agenda)
  • Dilrukshi Handunnetti (Sri Lanka): “Sri Lankan Girls Miss out on Sanitation Gains(Category: Monitoring WASH Commitments)

The winning entries can be viewed here: http://www.wsscc.org/media/wash-media-awards/2012-2014. A high resolution photograph and summary video can also be found there or at the World Water Week page.  

The winners received their awards today during a ceremony at the closing plenary session of the annual World Water Week in Stockholm.  In Stockholm this week, the journalists shared their experiences with leading water, sanitation, environment and development experts. The week concluded with a 2014 Stockholm Statement on Water, a collection of films and papers calling for a Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) on Water.

 

Journalists are key partners for sanitation, hygiene and water sector professionals in their awareness raising, advocacy and behaviour change work. Journalists play a central role in the highlighting of water and gender related issues and positioning of women as environmental leaders. They greatly contribute to bringing in the spotlight the too often neglected issues of the necessity of toilets and hand washing for a dignified, safe and healthy life for billions of people.

 

The biannual WASH Media Awards competition is sponsored by the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC, www.wsscc.org) and the Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI, www.siwi.org). More than 100 entries from 30 countries were evaluated by a Mr. Mark Tran, a notable international correspondent for The Guardian, UK.


Filed under: Uncategorized

Interactive Compendium of Sanitation Systems and Technologies now online!

2 September 2014 13:08 (America/New_York)

The interactive version of the Compendium of Sanitation Systems and Technologies (eCompendium) is now online!

The eCompendium is the digital version of the popular and well-know reference-manual Compendium of Sanitation Systems and Technologies published by Eawag/Sandec, WSSCC and IWA. It is a interactive planning tool designed for engineers and planners to facilitate decision-making on sanitation systems and technologies in meetings and workshops. The main added value to the eCompendium is that the user is guided throughout the entire sanitation-chain by the aid of interactive links. In order to select suitable technologies, a customised filter can be applied based on the desired input or output products of technologies. 

It is based on the second edition of the Compendium, which was recently published by Eawag/Sandec, WSSCC and IWA. It comprises the same content as the print version, plus additional links to references, further readings and cross-references to the Sustainable Sanitation and Water Management (SSWM) Toolbox at your fingertips. All Technology Info Sheets are now stored in the SSWM database and can be directly linked with previously uploaded factsheets, further readings, training materials, weblinks, videos and – yes, even ready-made powerpoint presentations from the SSWM repository!

The eCompendium has been designed and implemented by the SSWM team on behalf of Sandec/Eawag. It is one of a series of specific topic entry pages (STEPs) with the aim of making the SSWM content more accessible for particular target groups of SSWM partners and contributors.

For the SSWM Team,
Dorothee Spuhler


Filed under: Multimedia, Technology Tagged: Compendium of Sanitation Systems and Technologies

Unclogging the Blockages in Sanitation

1 September 2014 11:36 (America/New_York)

Perhaps one of the more ignored or misunderstood elements of water poverty by the general population and even the charitable sector is sanitation services. When you think about providing clean water, you conjure images of clear drinking water pouring out of a tap or buckets of well water used to water crops and serve livestock.

But then there’s the other stuff—the stuff that is not as pretty to think about or even to deal with, but is just as important—like unclogging toilets, and building latrines, and providing sanitary napkin containers and services for female students. That’s all sanitation.

The first Unclogging the Blockages conference organised by IRC, PSI, Water for People and WSUP Enterprises, took place on February 18-20, 2014, Kampala, Uganda. More than 170 people from in and out of the sector and around the world came together to explore the various challenges for sanitation as a business (SAAB) and began working on short and long-term solutions.

Participants identified seven key components to SAAB: (1) public sector; (2) business models; (3) finance; (4) technology; (5) demand creation and behaviour change; (6) monitoring; and (7) intersectoral links.

For each component participants plotted out potential outcomes and ways forward based on their ideas and a 30-day challenge, for example:

Business Models
Blockage: lack of models that are pro-poor inclusive; lack of understanding of technology
Desired outcome: Consumer understanding/happiness: Families say, “The toilet is my favorite part of the house.”
30-Day Challenge: Know your customers deeply for better service and success. —Advocacy through creative formats, get to the point and make it attractive, prove we have results.

The full set of action plans with a detailed breakdown by tasks and groups responsible for each of the seven themes is in the Unclogging the Blockages report. The Conference report and an accompanying factsheet are available at: www.ircwash.org/resources/unclogging-blockages-sanitation-business

A full set of conference materials including Powerpoint presentations can be found on the SuSanA website at: www.susana.org/en/events/past-event-pages/details/8


Filed under: Africa, Campaigns and Events, Economic Benefits, Publications Tagged: Sanitation as a business, Unclogging the Blockages in Sanitation

Sanitation Business Catalogue

1 September 2014 10:12 (America/New_York)

In this catalogue you will find 27 business propositions from sanitation entrepreneur association APPSANI in Indonesia to ZanaAfrica sanitary pads in Kenya.

Together, they offer a variety of services and all of them are looking to consolidate or expand their business, and bring sanitation services to scale for customers at the Base of the Pyramid.

This catalogue was produced for the Sanitation Business Matchmaking event at the first World BoP Convention & Expo in Singapore, 28-30 of August 2014.

Each individual business sheet in this catalogue describes what the entrepreneur offers and what he is looking for.

Download the catalogue at:
www.ircwash.org/resources/sanitation-business-catalogue


Filed under: Publications, Sanitary Facilities, Wastewater Management Tagged: Base of the Pyramid, catalogues, sanitation entrepreneurs

New results report from the WSSCC Global Sanitation Fund

29 August 2014 5:52 (America/New_York)

According to its latest Progress Report update, national programs supported through the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC) Global Sanitation Fund (GSF) show consistent strong growth and have made significant progress in eradicating the practice of open defecation.

Almost six million people now live in open-defecation free (ODF) communes, villages and districts. This is two million more than six months ago The total number of 3.1 million people with an improved latrine as a result of GSF-funded programs is around double the number reported a year ago.

As of 1 July 2014, the Global Sanitation Fund supports work actively in Cambodia, Ethiopia, India, Madagascar, Malawi, Nepal, Nigeria, Senegal, Tanzania, Togo and Uganda. In those countries, more than 140 sub-grantees have raised awareness of sanitation and hygiene nationally and in a number of regions. As a result of their work, more than three million people have access to improved toilets, among other leading indicators of progress.

The total number of 3.1 million people with an improved latrine as a result of GSF-funded programs is around double the number reported a year ago (1.6 million in June 2013). It is encouraging that the number of people in ODF environments and the number of people with improved latrines has continued to increase.

It suggests that efforts by WSSCC in the initial years to build consultative processes, introduce new systems and familiarize sub-grantees and local governments with methods of community-led total sanitation were a sound investment.

This mid-year progress update presents the on-going results of GSF program implementation.

To download a copy of the report, click here.


Filed under: Uncategorized

99 seconds on the toilet: a Guardian video animation

28 August 2014 13:29 (America/New_York)

Promoted as their best video of the day, the Guardian has produced a short video animation highlighting the plight of the 2.5 billion without a toilet.

More people have access to mobile phones than to bog-standard sanitation around the world. The numbers are actually quite close – both are around the 4.5bn mark. But the implications are clear: as a species, we value a text, a tweet, the incessant pulse of blinking pixels over one of our most basic sanitary needs: the loo.


Filed under: Multimedia, Sanitary Facilities Tagged: Guardian, videos

Global Handwashing Day Planner’s Guide, 3rd Edition

27 August 2014 10:21 (America/New_York)

Global Handwashing Day Planner’s Guide, 3rd Edition. 2014.

In addition to background information, the top five facts about handwashing you should know, and insights from the latest in handwashing research, the Planner’s Guide features:

  • Detailed celebration ideas designed to help religious organizations, schools, healthcare centers and more plan effective messaging and events.
  • An event checklist that helps planners organize and make sure their event planning is on track.
  • Spotlights on:
    • Sustainability (p. 17)
    • Small Doable Actions (p. 20)
    • Social Norms (p. 22)
  • And much more!

Filed under: Campaigns and Events Tagged: Global Handwashing Day, handwashing

Measuring the Safety of Excreta Disposal Behavior in India with the New Safe San Index: Reliability, Validity and Utility

27 August 2014 10:01 (America/New_York)

Measuring the Safety of Excreta Disposal Behavior in India with the New Safe San Index: Reliability, Validity and Utility. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(8), 8319-8346.

Marion W. Jenkins 1,2,*, Matthew C. Freeman 3 and Parimita Routray 2
1 Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California Davis, One Shields Ave., Davis, CA 95616, USA
2 Environmental Health Group, Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT, UK
3 Department of Environmental Health, Rollings School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
* Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.

Abstract: Methods to assess household excreta disposal practices are critical for informing public health outcomes of efforts to improve sanitation in developing countries. We present a new metric, the Safe San Index (SSI), to quantify the hygienic safety of a household’s defecation and human feces disposal practices in India, where behavioral outcomes from on-going public expenditures to construct household sanitation facilities and eliminate open defecation are poorly measured. We define hygienic safety of feces disposal as capture in a hygienic sanitation facility.

The SSI consists of 15 self-report items and two sub-scales, Latrine Use Frequency and Seven-Day Open Defecation Rate. Households are scored on a standardized scale from 0 (no defecation safely captured) to 100 (all defecation safely captured). We present results of a pilot study in Odisha, India to apply the Index to assess excreta disposal behaviors among rural households and evaluate the reliability and validity of the Index for estimating the rate of correct and consistent sanitation facility usage of household with an improved latrine.


Filed under: Research, South Asia Tagged: excreta disposal behaviors, India, Safe San Index

Uganda – 1st National Conference on Menstrual Hygiene Management, 2014

20 August 2014 13:20 (America/New_York)

The theme of the conference was Break the Silence on Menstruation, Keep the Girls in School. 

Author: Netwas Uganda

The conference had 4 objectives; a) to raise awareness on the impact of poor menstrual management, b) advocate for policy review, c) develop strategies for operationalizing existing policy, d) demonstrate sustainable good practices on menstrual management. The overall aim was to explore how best the School Health Policy can ensure girls get all the support they need to complete school and reach their full potential.


Filed under: Africa, Dignity and Social Development Tagged: menstrual hygiene management, Uganda

An update from Sanivation in Kenya

19 August 2014 14:09 (America/New_York)

Below are updates from Sanivation, check out the latest newsletter for more information on Sanivation projects and activities. 

One thing we believe in our bones is the customer is king. Over the past couple months, we have been sharing meals, asking questions, and collecting feedback from customers on both toilets and fuel. We have captured some inspiring quotes and wanted to share them with you. This month we will be introducing each short update in this newsletter with a quote from one of our customers.

Learnings from Kakuma: “Two people came and commented positively on my new latrine. One person came, a Somali lady, and asked me if I could sell it to her.” 

We’re currently processing (and soon to be publishing!) all of our learnings from Kakuma. From initial glances, the refugees were not only were satisfied but became promoters of the approach.After an initial review of feedback, we found that the refugees were not only satisfied but also became promoters of the approach. Already, one of our big lessons has been in the power of instituting quick feedback loops and a customer service approach to toilets. We feel honored to have worked with such great partners and are looking forward to continuing work with UNHCR, NRC, and CDC on how to bring this approach to even more refugees. The US Embassy Nairobi made an awesome video of our work. Check it out!

Introducing MakaaDumu: the next generation of household fuel. Made from human waste. “I have seen this charcoal before. I can try it too because I have heard that this charcoal burns for a long time.

In collaboration with a fellow briquette maker, we have created a compact, pillow-shaped briquette. These briquettes are akin to those used in 4th of July barbecues and each one is dense enough to hold its shape.  They also burn longer than wood or charcoal, which are already in short supply in areas that we have worked.

But don’t take our word for it! We had our briquettes tested by the Kenya Industrial Research and Development Institute (KIRDI), and were excited to see that MakaaDumu (our fuel from waste) has comparable energy to oven-dried wood. We are beginning to look for funding to help finance the production of MakaaDumu. See the full results from KIRDI and more reactions in the post Introducing MakaaDumu: The Next Generation of Household Fuel  authored by Benjamin Kramer-Roach our new Director of Energy Production.


Filed under: Progress on Sanitation, Sanitary Facilities Tagged: Kenya, Sanivation

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