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Updated: 33 min 24 sec ago

DFID should ensure sustainability of its WASH programmes – independent review

2 hours 44 sec ago

Richard Gledhill

By Richard Gledhill, ICAI lead commissioner for WASH review

62.9 million people – almost the population of the UK – that’s how many people in developing countries DFID claimed to have reached with WASH interventions between 2011 and 2015.

It’s an impressive figure. And – in our first ever ‘impact review’ – it’s a figure the Independent Commission for Aid Impact found to be based on credible evidence.

We assessed the results claim made by DFID about WASH, testing the evidence and visiting projects to see the results for ourselves. We  concluded that the claim was credible – calculated using appropriate methods and conservative assumptions.

But what does reaching 62.9 million people really mean? Have lives been transformed? And have the results been sustainable?

Research shows WASH interventions can have hugely positive ramifications for people’s lives. Access to water and sanitation and improved hygiene are obviously vitally important in their own right, but they can also contribute to improved school attendance, better nutrition and greater gender equality.

It  is often women and girls who do most of the water collection – we met women on one of our visits who spend up to five hours a day fetching water. And distant water sources and inadequate sanitation can expose women and girls to sexual violence.

Research also shows that to achieve lasting change calls for intensive engagement with beneficiaries, and local institutions, over time.

So what knock-on difference did the £713 million UK aid spent on WASH between 2010 and 2014 make to education, to health or to inequality? And was the impact sustained?

Unfortunately at the moment, across its overall WASH portfolio, DFID doesn’t really know.

For some programmes evidence has been collected – for example a £48.5 million Bangladesh project reached 21.4 million people with hygiene promotion, 1.8 million with access to clean water and more than one million children with clean water and latrines in their schools. At the end of this project evaluators were able to ascertain that there had been an increase in school enrolments, a reduction in school drop-out rates (particularly for girls),  and a drop in the diarrhoea rate for under-fives from 11% to 5.1%.

Similarly in Nigeria a DFID impact study found significant reductions in infant diarrhoea and resulting increases in school attendance. It also found that women were spending less time fetching water and taking care of sick children.

But despite these positive stories, our review found crucial impact data is not routinely collected at the programme level, and it is not aggregated at the international or the country level.

Many programmes simply are not set up to generate the evidence that would allow impact to be measured.

More surprisingly, even when broader impact data is readily available, our review found it is not being collected. We went to both Mozambique and Zimbabwe during our fieldwork, and discovered the local authorities kept detailed health statistics and school attendance data in the areas where DFID was investing in WASH. But this data was not collected or used by DFID.

Unused and broken “tippy-taps” in Hovano Secondary School. Gokwe, Zimbabwe Photo: ICAI

Not collecting this data makes it harder for DFID (which concentrates its WASH investments in the poorest areas) to target its investments towards the most vulnerable, including women and girls, the elderly and people with disabilities.

Looking ahead, the Global Goals commitment to ‘leaving no one behind’ is likely to increase the imperative for DFID to obtain more detailed baseline data and monitor the impact of its programmes on different groups, including  the poorest or most vulnerable.

Another crucial aspect to successful WASH projects is sustainability. But our review found that DFID is not doing enough to monitor if the results are sustained.

Concerningly, in none of the programmes we reviewed did DFID require its implementers to continue monitoring beyond project completion. In some instances, DFID’s partners (such as WaterAid and Unicef) were actually carrying out extended monitoring for their own purposes, but the results were not being passed back to DFID.

We acknoldge that sustainability is a real challenge, particularly for WASH programmes in the poorest areas. But DFID needs to do more to tackle this challenge – it is lagging behind some other leading donors in this area. We have therefore recommended that DFID takes urgent remedial action on the issue of sustainability.

And it is important that improvements happen soon, as last year DFID committed itself to ‘reaching’ a further 60 million people with sustainable access to safe drinking water or sanitation by 2020.

This is a welcome pledge, but to ensure this aid really has a transformative effect, DFID now needs to improve how it embeds sustainability in its programmes, and how it maximises their impact on people’s lives.

ICAI, 2016. Assessing DFID’s results in water, sanitation and hygiene : an impact review. London, UK: Independent Commission for Aid Impact. 37 p. : 10 boxes,  3 fig. Available at: icai.independent.gov.uk/report/wash


Filed under: Africa, Policy, Publications, South Asia Tagged: DFID, Evaluations, monitoring, Sustainability, WASH

Using microfinance to facilitate household investment in sanitation in rural Cambodia

19 May 2016 15:18 (America/New_York)

Using microfinance to facilitate household investment in sanitation in rural CambodiaHealth Policy & Planning, May 2016.

Authors: Kimberley H Geissler, Jeffrey Goldberg and Sheila Leatherman

Improved sanitation access is extremely low in rural Cambodia. Non-governmental organizations have helped build local supply side latrine markets to promote household latrine purchase and use, but households cite inability to pay as a key barrier to purchase.

To examine the extent to which microfinance can be used to facilitate household investment in sanitation, we applied a two-pronged assessment: (1) to address the gap between interest in and use of microfinance, we conducted a pilot study to assess microfinance demand and feasibility of integration with a sanitation marketing program and (2) using a household survey (n = 935) at latrine sales events in two rural provinces, we assessed attitudes about microfinance and financing for sanitation.

We found substantial stated intent to use a microfinance institution (MFI) loan to purchase a latrine (27%). Five percent of current owners used an MFI loan for latrine purchase. Credit officers attended 159 events, with 4761 individuals attending. Actual loan applications were low, with 4% of sales events attendees applying for a loan immediately following the event (mean = 1.7 loans per event). Ongoing coordination was challenging, requiring management commitment from the sanitation marketing program and commitment to social responsibility from the MFI.

Given the importance of improving sanitation coverage and concomitant health impacts, linking functional sanitation markets to already operational finance markets has the potential to give individuals and households more financial flexibility. Further product research and better integration of private vendors and financing modalities are necessary to create a scalable microfinance option for sanitation markets.

 


Filed under: Economic Benefits, Uncategorized Tagged: microfinance

WHO – Recovery Toolkit: Supporting countries to achieve health service resilience

19 May 2016 15:07 (America/New_York)

Recovery Toolkit: Supporting countries to achieve health service resilience: A library of tools & resources available during the recovery period of a public health emergency, 2016.

WHO

The overall goal of this Toolkit is to support countries in the reactivation of essential health services in the aftermath of a public health emergency. The Toolkit has been constructed to support the implementation of national health plans. The initial target audience are WHO Country Offices, for onward sharing and dissemination to ministries of health and implementation partners in-country.

Pages 44 – 48 are focused on WASH resources.


Filed under: Emergency Sanitation, Uncategorized

UNEP – Global Environment Outlook: Regional assessment for Asia and the Pacific

19 May 2016 14:56 (America/New_York)

GEO-6: Global Environment Outlook: Regional assessment for Asia and the Pacific, 2016. 

United Nations Environment Programme

The assessment provides the first integrative baseline in light of global and regional megatrends supported by open access to data and information. This is a great success not only of science informing policy, but of nations at the regional level acting together on the basis of science to achieve an authoritative assessment of the state,trends and outlook of the their regional environment.


Filed under: East Asia & Pacific Tagged: environment

UNEP – Global Environment Outlook: Regional assessment for Africa

19 May 2016 14:51 (America/New_York)

GEO-6: Global Environment Outlook: Regional assessment for Africa, 2016.

United Nations Environment Programme 

The GEO 6 regional assessment recognizes Africa’s rich natural capital – the diversity of soil, geology, biodiversity, water,landscapes and habitats- which if wisely managed, hold the promise to lead the region to a future where ecosystem integrity,as well as human health and well-being are continuously enhanced.

It also observes that the economic growth of Africa hinges on the sustainable management of its natural capital that involves reconciling wise stewardship with human development for today’s population and future generations. This requires both the protection and valuation of these natural assets, as well as effectively communicating their importance.


Filed under: Africa Tagged: environment

op Technologies in Environment & Sustainability 2016 – Research and Markets

19 May 2016 13:50 (America/New_York)

Top Technologies in Environment & Sustainability 2016 – Research and Markets | Source: Business Wire, May 19 2016

This research report highlights the top ten environmental technologies that increases the earth’s sustainability and are projected to make the highest impact in the near and medium terms. The technologies have been filtered from a wide spectrum of atmospheric, land-based, water and general environmental technologies using TechVision’s proprietary selection methodology. The assessment criteria cover patenting activity, funding, market potential, Mega Trend impact, regional adoption potential, sectors of economic impact, technology disruptiveness, and the environment and sustainability cluster evolution.

Each section on the top technologies present an overview of market trends and potential, patent landscape, funding, application impact, Mega Trend impact, disruptiveness, regional trends, innovators, and key strategic planning points.

The top ten technologies in environment and sustainability are food waste upcycling, membrane biofilm wastewater treatment, micro irrigation, off-grid desalination, particulate air pollution control, point source carbon dioxide reduction, precision agriculture, waste-to-energy, wastewater membrane filtration and wastewater nutrient recovery

Read the complete article.


Filed under: Technology

SuSanA monthly webinar 2: “Collaborative monitoring, a prerequisite to achieve universal access to WASH,” May 26th 2016 at 9:00 EDT

19 May 2016 9:05 (America/New_York)

Please join us for a webinar on ‘Collaborative monitoring, a prerequisite to achieve universal access to WASH’ scheduled for May 26th 2016 at 9:00 EDT (New York time). This is the second webinar in a monthly recurring series on SuSanA.

Overview: Through the UN Sustainable Development Goals, countries have committed to achieve universal access to water and sanitation by 2030. To realise this ambitious goal, they must pull together and regularly review progress in water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) access. This webinar is an opportunity to look into some of the main obstacles to effective monitoring (lack of transparency, inclusion and accountability) and how collaborative monitoring can bring a partial response. The WASHwatch platform will also be presented as a tool to achieve collaborative monitoring with concrete examples of the different platform’s uses by partners.

Presenter: Elisa Dehove – Policy Officer – Monitoring and Accountability, WaterAid

The webinar will last approximately 45 minutes. Elisa’s presentation will be followed by perspectives from other WaterAid offices, followed by an open discussion with webinar participants. We will also open the session 30 minutes beforehand for a low-key ‘mingle’ among participants, where you can use your computer video or microphone to chat with others.

The webinar is being hosted by Stockholm Environment Institute and the SuSanA secretariat as part of a grant to SEI funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

SuSanA forum link: http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/146-webinars-and-online-meetings/18029-susana-monthly-webinar-2-collaborative-monitoring-a-prerequisite-to-achieve-universal-access-to-wash-may-26th-900-edt-new-york-time

Time:
9:00 New York/Washington DC
14:00 London, 15:00 Stockholm, 16:00 Nairobi ,20:00 Hanoi, 23:00 Sydney

To register please follow this link: www.susana.org/en/webinar-registration

If you would like to present your work, please contact sarah.dickin@sei-international.org to sign-up for future dates.


Filed under: Uncategorized Tagged: monitoring, SuSanA, webinar

Bangladesh – Faecal sludge management new sanitation challenge

18 May 2016 13:55 (America/New_York)

Bangladesh – Faecal sludge management new sanitation challenge | Source: The Daily Star, May 18 2016 |

Emphasising the need for managing the faecal sludge (human excreta) speakers at a roundtable yesterday said this sludge will pose huge threats to environment and public health if not properly managed.

Participants at a roundtable titled “Faecal Sludge Management: Second Generation Sanitation Challenge” at The Daily Star Centre in the capital yesterday, jointly organised by the newspaper, DSK, ITN-Buet, and Practical Action. Photo: Star

The construction of thousands of pit latrines without thinking of ensuring proper hygienic separation of excreta from human contact and faecal sludge management (FSM) eventually emerged as a second generation sanitation problem for the country, they said at a programme at The Daily Star Centre in the capital.

Practical Action Bangladesh, ITN-Buet, Dushtha Shasthya Kendra (DSK) and The Daily Star jointly organised the programme.

Prof Muhammad Ashraf Ali, a teacher of Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology, gave a keynote presentation on “Faecal Sludge Management: Key Issues and the Institution and Regulatory Framework.”

He mentioned that only four million or 20 percent of the total population of Dhaka city is currently under the sewerage network coverage while the rest 156 million are covered by on-site system. “In the absence of proper pit-emptying services in the latrines, the pit-contents are often drained into the surrounding low lying areas manually posing a great risk to cleaners and public health,” he observed.

Read the complete article.


Filed under: Sanitary Facilities, South Asia Tagged: Bangladesh, faecal sludge management

Identification and quantification of pathogenic helminth eggs using a digital image system

18 May 2016 13:38 (America/New_York)

Identification and quantification of pathogenic helminth eggs using a digital image system. Experimental Parasitology, July 2016.

Authors: B. Jiméneza, C. Maya, et. al.

A system was developed to identify and quantify up to seven species of helminth eggs (Ascaris lumbricoides -fertile and unfertile eggs-, Trichuris trichiura, Toxocara canis, Taenia saginata, Hymenolepis nana, Hymenolepis diminuta, and Schistosoma mansoni) in wastewater using different image processing tools and pattern recognition algorithms.

The system allows the helminth eggs most commonly found in wastewater to be reliably and uniformly detected and quantified. In addition, it provides the total number of eggs as well as the individual number by species, and for Ascaris lumbricoides it differentiates whether or not the egg is fertile.

The system only requires basically trained technicians to prepare the samples, as for visual identification there is no need for highly trained personnel. The time required to analyze each image is less than a minute. This system could be used in central analytical laboratories providing a remote analysis service.

 


Filed under: Research, Wastewater Management

An Update of Themes and Trends in Urban Community-Led Total Sanitation Projects

18 May 2016 13:23 (America/New_York)

An Update of Themes and Trends in Urban Community-Led Total Sanitation Projects, 2015. 38th WEDC International Conference, Loughborough University, UK, 2015.

This briefing paper identifies common themes and trends of Urban Community-Led Total Sanitation (UCLTS). The study relies on literature from 14 different projects across India and Africa alongside articles that focused on UCLTS and participation in urban sanitation projects.

The hope is to provide an overview for those working in the field by identifying common characteristics, problems and opportunities.

The paper ends with a list of recommendations for those currently working on UCLTS projects and those interested in transferring the CLTS model to urban environments.

 


Filed under: Dignity and Social Development, Sanitary Facilities Tagged: Community-Led Total Sanitation, urban community-led total sanitation

Can collective action strategies motivate behavior change to reduce open defecation in rural India?

18 May 2016 9:27 (America/New_York)

Can collective action strategies motivate behavior change to reduce open defecation in rural India? Waterlines, April 2016.

Authors: Payal Hathi, Dean Spears, Diane Coffey. RICE Institute.

The world’s remaining open defecation is increasingly concentrated in rural India. The Indian government’s efforts to reduce open defecation by providing subsidies for latrine construction have been largely unsuccessful in addressing the problem. It is now clear that behavior change must be the priority if progress on ending open defecation is to be made.

While community-led strategies have proven effective in various developing country contexts, there are serious reasons to question whether similar methods can work in rural India.  Through both quantitative and qualitative analyses, we find that strict social hierarchies that continue to govern daily interactions in rural life today obstruct the spirit of cooperation upon which such methods rely.

Additionally, caste-based notions of purity and pollution make the simple latrines used all over the developing world unattractive to rural Indians.  In a context where people identify most closely with their caste and religious groups rather than their geographical villages, our findings suggest that a more nuanced understanding of the idea of “community” is required.  More experimentation, both with community-led and other strategies, is needed in order to effectively move from open defecation to latrine use in rural India.


Filed under: Dignity and Social Development, Sanitation and Health, South Asia Tagged: behaviour change, India, open defecation

‘Trash banking’ takes off around the world

17 May 2016 15:58 (America/New_York)

‘Trash banking’ takes off around the world | Source: Waste Dive, May 2016 |

Dive Brief:

  • The Mutiara Trash Bank in Makassar, Indonesia is seen as a leading example of the expanding “trash banking” system. The country has 2,800 trash banks in 129 cities which serve 175,000 people. 
  • Residents bring in recyclables that are weighed for value. In exchange they can withdraw or deposit money from bank accounts. Some banks allow residents to pay directly for rice, phone cards or electricity bills. The Makassar government commits to buying the waste at fixed prices and then sells it to waste merchants who ship it to Java.
  • Makassar produces 800 tons of waste per day, much of which ends up in a large landfill. Waste pickers, who are often women and children, work to retrieve valuable materials from the growing pile. According to Indonesia’s Ministry of Environment and Forestry, 70% of the country’s waste goes to landfills.

Read the complete article.


Filed under: Dignity and Social Development, Economic Benefits Tagged: trash banking, waste pickers

Creating Alliances to Accelerate Commercially Viable Sanitation

17 May 2016 15:12 (America/New_York)

Creating Alliances to Accelerate Commercially Viable Sanitation, 2015.

Toilet Board Coalition.

Five lessons on co-creating collaborative, sustainable initiatives
The lessons learned from the TBC co-creating approach will be of interest to sectors beyond sanitation, where investors or development players are facing a similar situation characterised by a lack of sustainable, investable businesses in spite of immense needs.

#1: START BY LEARNING FROM BEST PRACTITIONERS
It is tempting to build models that are tailored to companies’ expertise and resources. Whenever this was done, it did not really work. High potential models started by scanning the world for innovations, taking inspiration from best practices and filling gaps where needed.

#2: INVOLVE PARTNERS IN CO-CREATION EARLY ON
The TBC observed the importance of involving key partners early on in an open and iterative process, ideally with inperson meetings. Also, expectations need to be managed carefully as many endeavours do not actually lead to opportunities immediately so.

#3: DECIDE UPFRONT WHICH PARTNERSHIPS TO SUPPORT
Partnerships can bring a lot of value but building them is a complex and coordination-heavy process. Hence a formal decision is required upfront to invest sufficient resources into a long-term effort, which will not necessarily deliver immediate results.

 


Filed under: Economic Benefits Tagged: commercially viable sanitation

Can collective action strategies motivate behaviour change to reduce open defecation in rural India?

17 May 2016 14:54 (America/New_York)

Can collective action strategies motivate behaviour change to reduce open defecation in rural India? Waterlines, May 2016 |

Authors: Payal Hathi, Dean Spears and Diane Coffey

The world’s remaining open defecation is increasingly concentrated in rural India. The Indian Government’s efforts to reduce open defecation by providing subsidies for latrine construction have been largely unsuccessful in addressing the problem. It is now clear that behaviour change must be the priority if progress on ending open defecation is to be made.

While community-led strategies have proven effective in various developing country contexts, there are serious reasons to question whether similar methods can work in rural India. Through both quantitative and qualitative analyses, we find that strict social hierarchies that continue to govern daily interactions in rural life today obstruct the spirit of cooperation upon which such methods rely.

Additionally, caste-based notions of purity and pollution make the simple latrines used all over the developing world unattractive to rural Indians. In a context where people identify most closely with their caste and religious groups rather than their geographical villages, our findings suggest that a more nuanced understanding of the idea of ‘community’ is required. More experimentation, both with community-led and other strategies, is needed in order to effectively move from open defecation to latrine use in rural India.

 


Filed under: Dignity and Social Development, Hygiene Promotion, South Asia Tagged: behaviour change, India, open defecation

Tiger worm toilets: lessons learned from constructing household vermicomposting toilets in Liberia

17 May 2016 14:46 (America/New_York)

Tiger worm toilets: lessons learned from constructing household vermicomposting toilets in Liberia. Waterlines, May 2016.

Authors: David Watako, Koslengar Mougabe, Thomas Heath.

In response to the poor urban sanitation in Monrovia’s slums and Buchanan’s peri-urban areas in Liberia, Oxfam piloted worm toilets (aka Tiger Toilets), constructing 180 toilets between 2011 and 2015. One toilet was constructed per household for families containing fewer than 10 people. Each toilet was connected to a biodigester containing 2 kg of African night crawlers (Eudrilus eugeniae).

This paper documents the programme approach including how the community was mobilized and the construction process. The results section reviews field observations, challenges, and the maintenance problems encountered. In the discussion the paper reviews the design changes, lessons learned, limits for scale, and critical factors for success (favourable environment, local supply, infiltration capacity, and local technicians).

The paper concludes that although the project is still ongoing, the study suggests that the African night crawlers can digest significant volumes of human excreta if proper conditions of aeration, moisture, and temperature are met.

 


Filed under: Africa, Sanitary Facilities, Uncategorized Tagged: Liberia, night crawlers, tiger worm toilets

UNC and P&G to Provide First Analysis of Environmental Health in Malawi Hospitals

17 May 2016 10:55 (America/New_York)

UNC and P&G to Provide First Analysis of Environmental Health in Malawi Hospitals | Source: UNC News, May 15 2016 |

Millions of Malawians seek medical care in the country’s health care facilities each year. Yet, an analysis of the environmental health status in these facilities has never been performed. This summer, baseline measurements will be collected thanks to a partnership between the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Procter & Gamble (P&G) through the Children’s Safe Drinking Water Program (CSDW).

Patients being cared for at Kamuzu Central Hospital in Malawi.

“Health facilities should not be places to acquire infection due to lack of clean water, hygiene and sanitation; they should be places for cure,” says Innocent Mofolo, associate country director of UNC Project-Malawi. “WaSH should be part of an integrated approach to health and human development. This assessment will help determine WaSH gaps that exist in most of our health facilities and devise strategies to improve the situation.”

The assessment of 45 health facilities in the northern, central and southern regions of Malawi is being funded by a generous donation from P&G. Data collection will begin in August by researchers from the UNC Institute for Global Health and Infectious Diseases and its UNC Project in Malawi and the Water Institute at UNC.

Read the complete article.

 


Filed under: Africa, Sanitary Facilities, Sanitation and Health Tagged: hospitals, Malawi

Sulabh Int’l Museum of Toilets: Offbeat, Bizarre, Fun-filled and Informative

17 May 2016 10:48 (America/New_York)

Sulabh Int’l Museum of Toilets: Offbeat, Bizarre, Fun-filled and Informative | Source: Sulabh International, May 17 2016 |

A trip to the Sulabh International Museum of Toilets at Sulabh Gram in Delhi, is a fun filled walk through history of sanitation practices from across the world — an experience that is unique, somewhat bizarre and deeply informative. 

The museum has on display more than 300 exhibits comprising of Photographs, models, originals, jokes, literature, replicas, cartoons and so on. It is also an important haunt for those researching on the subject of sanitation. As of now, there are a total of nine toilet museums in the world. Sulabh’s was the first such museum when it started in 1992.

This museum secured the 3rd position on TIME magazine’s ‘World’s 10 Weirdest Museums’ compiled in the magazine’s November, 2014, edition. Its popularity can be gauged by the fact that it receives approximately 10,000 visitors per year.

Varun Kumar, Assistant Curator at the museum, takes me on a study tour of the museum. Varun dispels the theory that the water closet flush toilet is a western invention.

Pointing to photographs of remains of the Harappan settlements, he explains: “WC flush toilet was invented in India. It was in use in India in the Harappan settlements since at least 2500 BC. It was a sitting water closet pour flushed toilet with a bucket of water acting as a flush due to which the excreta got drained into a covered drain which disposed it outside the city not contaminating the water sources or rivers”.

Read the complete article.


Filed under: Sanitary Facilities

Community of Practice on Sanitation and Hygiene in Developing Countries

17 May 2016 10:41 (America/New_York)

Linkedin Community of Practice on Sanitation and Hygiene in Developing Countries – 5,745 members

Welcome to the Community of Practice on Sanitation and Hygiene. The aim of the CoP is to reinforce the global community of those working in sanitation and hygiene and create a neutral platform to share and learn together.

The group is managed by a coordinator who currently sits within the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC). The coordinator works with a global team of ‘stewards’ who are dedicated and well respected sector professionals. The Stewards are responsible for the strategic decisions for the CoP and each one brings different opportunities, networks and geographical representation to the table.


Filed under: Hygiene Promotion, Web sites Tagged: communities of practice

Meet the bin scavengers saving SA R750-million a year

13 May 2016 13:33 (America/New_York)

Meet the bin scavengers saving SA R750-million a year | Source: Sunday Times/South Africa, May 8 2016 |

His name is Peter May, and the collars of his dapper blue shirt have been ironed flat.

“I have the same name as an English cricketer,” he says, pulling a trolley that bulges with rubbish bags.

Peter May knows his bins Image: Ruvan Boshoff

But he is not a cricketer, and for him the waste inside the bags is not garbage. It is his livelihood: bundles of white paper, cardboard, newspaper and light steel sifted from bins and landfill sites across Cape Town.

May is one of the country’s 60 000 to 90 000 waste pickers who, in a recent surprise finding, save our municipalities up to R750-million a year.

They divert recyclables away from the landfills at no, or little cost. Now their fate hangs in the balance as the waste economy sets off on a new path.

According to a report by the Centre for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), the waste and recycling sector “is on the brink of change” thanks to mandatory extended producer responsibility, which means producers will be responsible for the waste they generate. This often takes the form of a reuse, buy-back or recycling programme.

The CSIR has done research to see if waste pickers can be incorporated into the formal economy, and Professor Linda Godfrey, who led the study, said: “The most surprising finding for me was when we started to attach financial values to the savings by municipalities as a result of informal waste pickers.”

Read the complete article.


Filed under: Africa, Dignity and Social Development, Economic Benefits Tagged: South Africa, waste pickers

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